Posted November 01, 2013

The Brits Have a Glow-in-the-Dark Bike Path

Gear

glow

A company in the southwest of London has come up with a glow-in-the-dark liquid coating that can be applied on pavement, like a bike path. This serves two purposes: it’s super environmental friendly — think of all the electricity that’s saved from needing fewer lights — and it just looks oh so cool.

Pro-Teq has used their new high-tech creation on a test bike path in Cambridge Park. According to the company, the material works by absorbing UV rays during the day and releases it later when it’s dark.

The company’s owner Hamish Scott says in a press release the paint even auto-adjusts brightness (sort of like your iPhone):

It adjusts to the natural light, so if it is pitch black outside the luminous natural earth enhances, and if the sky is lighter, it won’t release as much luminosity – it adjusts accordingly, its almost like it has a mind of its own.

The company hopes the British government will embrace this environmentally friendly technology, which, if it works as advertised, should save cities tons of money on their electricity bills. And judging by this British grandma’s recent reaction to a gas bill hike, it’s probably for the best that the Brits find cheaper utilities asap.

[h/t Atlantic Cities]

3 comments
KeysSteven
KeysSteven

Hold on, pardner.  If pathway vision were only reason for city "lights" then maybe "electricity..sav(ings)" would come into play here, Ben, but I'm guessing crime-prevention is another reason for night-time lighting.  I can just here the muggers talking now (in my British accent): 'Hey mate, get any swag (purses) to-nite?'  No, Tommy, that darn glow-in-the-dark gravel has got me standing out like a sore thumb!  Bloody awful, it is!'   

And exactly why is this paint "super environmentally friendly (x2)?"  That would be a first.

JackBarker
JackBarker

Well something is wrong here. There is a Cambridge Park in London; in Leytonstone, to be exact, but that is north of the river in the East End, so that would be NE London, not SW. And it's a road, not an actual park.

On the other hand, the company Pro-Teq is located in Guilford, Surrey, which is 32 miles SW of London, and is not in any way, a part of London.  Moreover, your illustration appears on Pro-Teq's website, and appears to be "Christ’s Pieces, a well-known park in the east side of the centre of Cambridge." Cambridge is a well-known university town, 65 miles North of London.